This is what the future of work looks like part 2

I just fell in love with the Women Who Code job board. They’re making job hunting slightly easier by including two pieces of critical content alongside their job postings.

The first is an overview of the interview process, providing much needed transparency into a stressful process.

future workforce trends
Transparency ftw

The second piece of content is an interactive list of company benefits that actually matter to me. I look at hundreds of jobs a month. I rarely see such forward thinking filters.

future workforce trends
Benefit search

Talk about the future of work is dominated by robots taking our jobs. While that type of content makes for good metrics, the robot narrative ignores how organizations are evolving into better places of work. Organizations are finally shedding outdated Baby Boomer models of work. They’re open to experimenting with new ways of work and management.

I teach people how to find remote jobs. Each week I round up the most interesting remote jobs that I find online. I’m constantly running into companies that are changing the status quo. Many of them offer benefits like this:

future workforce trends
Benefits at Glitch
Glitch’s inclusion statement

I’ve got a massive crush on Glitch, the company whose benefits are listed above. They get it.

Companies like Glitch are the future of work. They’re also what we miss when we only talk about robots in the future of work.

When job boards like Women Who Code include searchable filters like parental leave, 100% work from home, and unconscious bias training, they signal that workers have a choice. Workers can choose to work for old school companies that preach meritocracy but believe work only happens between 9-5. Or they can find an innovative company that believes in lifting up underrepresented voices, flexible work, and supporting parents in the workplace.

Here’s how to avoid endless resume reviews in career services

The majority of career services professionals hate resume reviews. They can’t say this out right of course. Career services leadership and university administration expects their department to function as a resume review service. I know this because it was common knowledge when I worked in career services. Full confession, I also hated resume reviews when I was an MBA career coach.

Career services leadership has access to an easy to solution that will put an end to resume reviews: Teach students how to use new resume platforms that use artificial intelligence to review and score resumes.

I wrote about how to write resumes using artificial intelligence on my website for remote jobs. I explain the three platforms that use AI to review resumes and show how to use them in the resume writing process.

Share it with your students or adopt the process in your own department. Then think of all the things career services could do if you didn’t have resume reviews. And while you’re questioning resumes reviews, start questioning all the things career services is doing that need to change.

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Learning how to learn

The shelf life of your college degree is getting shorter and shorter.


David Blake, founder of Degreed on the podcast episode, Speaking the language of skills

Spend any time in future of work or higher education circles, and you’ll notice how often people throw around the term lifelong learning. It’s incredibly in fashion to tell people how they’ll need to become lifelong learners. Beyond that though aren’t a lot of resources on how people should make this shift.

Degreed is out to change that. This interview with the founder of Degreed is an inside look at the challenges and opportunities of cultivating life long learning among employees.

I really appreciated this podcast episode, especially where they talk about learning to learn and creating a learning environment in the workplace. Plus I learned about an entire new category of YouTube videos: bad corporate training.

If you spend any time in future of work circles or higher education, you’ll like this perspective.

This is what the future of work looks like

Note: I wanted to title this post What We’re Missing When We Only Talk About Robots as the Future of Work. The future of work is filled with new ways of working that challenge traditional career paths and organizational structures. I’m going to spend more time writing about these organizations just as soon as I finish up the first draft of my book and my life returns to semi-normal. 

I’m crushing on a small company called The Pudding. They’re a journalism meets data engineering company. As they describe it, their work  “explain(s) ideas debated in culture with visual essays.” And they do wild reporting, like The World Through the Eyes of the US and Music Borders, an interactive map of the top songs in the world in May 2018 (including audio!).

Their company culture is what really wooed me. Here’s how they put it:

We’re six full-time journalist-engineers who operate as a collective rather than hierarchical team.

I love that there’s no corporate fluff here. They continue:

Much of our work is done autonomously, with individuals choosing their essays and owning the whole story, from research to code. Each team member can do every step: research and reporting, data analysis, design, writing, and code.

Hot damn. They paint a picture of an organization where people own their own projects, collaborate, and bring a seriously impressive set of hybrid skills with them.

The description continues:

So we experiment, a lot. The creative process feels more like workshopping a movie script than critiquing a bar chart. Consequently, many of our ideas are killed during production, but we wouldn’t have it any other way! It means we’re trying unproven, never-done-before things.

I’ve worked in creative jobs and non creative ones. The ability to workshop an idea and get feedback is an important skill that’s rarely mastered outside of creative teams. Companies frequently talk about the need for collaboration skills. Yet it’s hard to pin down exactly what they mean. Then you see it laid out like this and you instantly recognize it. Work at this company and you’ll collaborate to create impressive pieces of work.

But here’s what really got me: transparency.

They’re transparent about how they make money and how much they pay people.

From The Pudding website:

Our primary revenue sources are 1) essay sponsors and 2) white-labeled content. Sponsorship is akin to what you might find on a podcast…”this article was made possible by Blue Apron.”

Now take a look at their salaries:

TITLE COMPENSATION
Intern Not currently offering internships (follow our socials for updates)
Jr. Journalist-Engineer $70k
Journalist-Engineer $82k
Sr. Journalist-Engineer $100k
Editor $115k

Could you imagine your company doing this? Could you imagine how it might change your company culture if the place you worked embraced transparency around spending, budgets, and salaries?

If you want more, have a look at what it’s like to work here.

More organizations should follow this lead. With this level of detail you know what you’re going to get as an employee. If you’re reading this and thinking, I don’t want to work in a place like this, good. At least you know. It’s usually quite difficult to figure out what a place is really like without talking to someone.

The Pudding puts it all on the table.

The future of work needs more transparency. The Pudding is setting the example.

I leave you with the number one song in Iceland from May 2018.

All Americans should listen to this one.

I’m burning through a new series, Perception Gaps, a podcast that “explores different topics in which people’s perception, or what they think is true, doesn’t actually line up with reality.”

It’s absolutely fascinating. But the one that I wish everyone could listen to is The Other Side, a dive into the political divide in our country.

In the episode, I learned that what studies show we overestimate the amount of people who believe things on the other side and that we treat politics like a sporting event in the US (which ok, I knew that but cool to hear it validated). I also listened to a really good story about how two freshmen roommates found friendship, despite having their very different political beliefs.

It’s such a good episode. I hope it stops and make you think about your own assumptions and the stereotypes we give into.

Go share it with everyone you know, but especially everyone who thinks like you do.

Probably the best writing advice to date

I’m in the final sprint to finish the first draft of my book in the next four weeks which means I’m ignoring pretty much everything else. Except Twitter.

I’ve struggled all day, every day to ignore Twitter since I started writing this book back in October. I’ve failed on that pretty much every day. Though, I have reduced my addiction to my carefully curated information hose. I wonder how much more quality procrastination writers had before Twitter.

Sometimes though Twitter comes through and delivers something so helpful and timely that I’m reminded for all the reasons I love this site over any other.

Behold the best advice on writing ever:

I’ve had three mantras to get me through the first draft:

finished not perfect

the purpose of the first draft is for it to exist

let the editor sort this out

Those mantras help me with the writing process. They keep me moving forward.

But Ava’s advice validated all the feels that happen when you see your raw, messy thoughts masquerading as a future book.

I screenshotted her tweet and read it every day right now as I push towards the finish.

Share it with anyone you know who writes.

This podcast about Magic the Gathering gave me all the feels

Never thought I’d write something like that. But this 99% Invisible episode on the storytelling and design that goes into making this epic card game (and fanbase) is absolutely fascinating. Magic the Gathering folks get a lot of shit for their fandom and obsession with fantasy worlds. This podcast takes you deeper into the game, covering strategy and the people whose day jobs involve building these worlds. It’s really well done.

Most people might skip this topic. But that’d be a mistake.

Give it a listen.

 

(def not how to play Magic)

Hey career services, you all ok over there?

Seriously. How you doing career services? Hanging in there?

I ask because things are looking a bit rough. I just read a summary from  NACE’s 2018 Student Survey on the resources students use most in the full time job search. The numbers are bleak.

NACECareerServices

Source: NACE, The Job Search Resources Students Use, Find Most Useful

Yiiiiiikes. Only 26.2% of students who used career fairs found them helpful, 9% for virtual career fairs. Career services puts in a ton of work for these events and students are like,

Only 20% of students surveyed found employer presentations useful. Same for having employer reps on campus. Both resources takes a tremendous amount of coordination and logistics in career services.

Alumni relations touts the benefits of connecting current students with alumni but alumni-as-a-job-search-resource didn’t do much better. Only 15% of students who tapped alumni found them useful.

But the worst bit is that 50.3% of students considered company websites useful in the job search while only 21.6% considered the career center useful.

Ouch.

If students find company websites more helpful than the entirety of resources and people within career services, then what is the goal of career centers?

With this kind of data it’s pretty clear career centers need to change things up. And that probably feels like an overwhelming task right now.

I know you guys work your faces off. You’re underfunded and understaffed. After being the department that was ignored for years, all eyes are on your department because now you’re suddenly responsible for all the outcomes. As a former university MBA career coach I worked in a system that valued outcomes above all else. In MBA land, outcomes = rankings and rankings > everything else. Tying your work to student outcomes with metrics defined by outsiders doesn’t make change any easier. In fact, it makes it harder.

But just because it’s hard doesn’t mean you can’t, and shouldn’t, change it up. Those numbers don’t lie. Students don’t find value in what you’re offering.

I’ve had plenty of positive, passionate conversations with many of you who are bursting with ideas to change the status quo in university career centers. I know that many of you feel limited in your ability to make change happen.

So here’s my advice to you, the career services professional who has refreshing, bold, impactful, fabulously bad ass ideas that will transform career services for the better: make it happen in 2019.

Wait, wait. Let me rephrase.

Here’s what I want you to do:

Go rogue, break the all the damn rules. 

Here’s how to do that:

  • Ask for forgiveness not permission.
  • Don’t wait for leadership to change things. Change begins with you.
  • Apply for leadership roles even if you’re not qualified. Push through personal doubt.
  • Pitch radical presentations and workshops for every single university career services conference. If they don’t accept yours host a webinar at your school or for your personal network instead.
  • Actually, host a webinar on the subject anyways. You’ll learn valuable marketing and public speaking skills in the process.
  • Join the conference committee for your regional or national career center conference. Vote for radical presentations from underrepresented voices.
  • Listen to and lift up underrepresented voices in the industry. Change and new ideas come from diversity of perspectives and experience.
  • Apply for board openings at national university career organizations. Challenge outdated ideas.
  • Experiment with new workshops and coaching methods (even if its your first year on the job).
  • Host a design thinking workshop to get better ideas into your department. Then execute on them.
  • Question the status quo. Ask why. Keep asking why.
  • Find your power squad. Find the people who ask why, who challenge the status quo. Get inspired. Then build something together.
  • After you build it, reflect. What worked? What will you do differently next time?
  • Strive for impact not outcomes.
  • Measure your impact. Then promote the shit out of your success. Don’t expect others to notice.
  • Make a list of every.single.resource and workshop your department offers. Then ask why. “Why career fairs? Why resume reviews?”
  • Then ask how. “How might we do this instead?”
  • Every time your department or leadership claims they are innovating, ask how. Then ask what makes those initiatives innovative.
  • Get students involved. Ask them what they need.
  • Better yet, give them a budget and support to create a program they need so they get experience creating and collaborating.
  • Stop looking for ideas at elite schools and in departments with all the money. Instead, look at all kinds of institutions for new ideas (especially community colleges)
  • Get to know recent alumni (ignore alumni relations – reach out on LinkedIn personally). Interview them. Translate alumni insights and experiences into new initiatives.
  • Learn about new hiring algorithms and how they’re making old school career advice obsolete.
  • Upskill regularly.
  • Take an online course in change management to learn how to influence change.
  • Commit to chaos in 2019.

Disrupt is an overused phrase. But career services needs to change and change fast. If students get more value out of a company website than they do your center, things are really not ok in career services.

So to my fellow career coaches who are nodding their heads along to this article, bursting with ideas: go forth and create chaos. Wreck the status quo. Challenge your leadership. Become the new leadership.

Commit to chaos in 2019.

Understanding hiring algorithms: Career coaching in 2019

Today, hiring technology vendors increasingly build predictive features into tools that are used throughout the hiring process.They rely on machine learning techniques, where computers detect patterns in existing data (called training data) to build models that forecast future outcomes in the form of different kinds of scores and rankings.”  Help Wanted: An Examination of Hiring Algorithms, Equity, and Bias

The hiring process is changing faster than most realize. Automated tools that use machine learning to source, analyze, and rank candidates are already integrated into the hiring process, sometimes without candidates knowing it. As we move into 2019, the adoption of predictive hiring tools show no sign of slowing down.

Career coaches and university career services departments have a responsibility to understand these hiring algorithms and their impact on job seekers. They need to create new strategies and update career workshops to help job seekers navigate hiring algorithms. (spoiler alert: my career workshops cover this)

If you don’t work in tech, artificial intelligence and machine learning can seem like intimidating topics. Even more unhelpful, hiring algorithms are a bit of a black box. The transformation to an automated hiring process is happening behind the scenes. It’s hard to figure out which companies use this technology and exactly these tools work. It’s challenging to know which automated tools use questionable data or cement bias into the hiring process.

Luckily, there’s a new report out to help career coaches get up to speed on new HR technology and hiring algorithms. The report, Help Wanted: An Examination of Hiring Algorithms, Equity, and Bias,is produced by the nonprofit Upturn. Upturn’s mission is to promote “equity and justice in the design, governance, and use of digital technology.” Their mission shines through in their new report.

The report offers career coaches a comprehensive review of new hiring technology. The report is well-written, making it an accessible read. More importantly it isn’t filled with marketing promises that dominate HR tech press. Instead, it dives deep into the issues and impacts that hiring algorithms can have on the hiring process. The report covers the ways in which bias can be baked into hiring algorithms. It’s a refreshing piece of content in a sea of HR tech press that relentlessly praises new hiring technology as efficient and transformative, often ignoring the impact on the candidate.

Honestly I could fill this post with quotes from the report. But I’ll stick to these two bits from the executive summary. If you don’t have the time to read the report, at least read the executive summary. Then carve out 30 minutes to read the rest before 2019. Consider this your last professional development activity of 2018.

Hiring is rarely a single decision point, but rather a cumulative series of small decisions. Predictive technologies can play very different roles throughout the hiring funnel, from determining who sees job advertisements, to estimating an applicant’s performance, to forecasting a candidate’s salary requirements.

Hiring tools that assess, score, and rank jobseekers can overstate marginal or unimportant distinctions between similarly qualified candidates. In particular, rank-ordered lists and numerical scores may influence recruiters more than we realize, and not enough is known about how human recruiters act on predictive tools’ guidance.

After you read the report, go further, and read How to learn about ML/AI as a non tech person.

Remote jobs are going to be hot hot hot in 2019

In 2017, 43% Americans worked remotely during part of their work week. That was up from 39% in 2012. With the proliferation of remote job boards and a flood of digital nomad lifestyle pics on Insta, it’s no wonder people are getting curious about remote work. The days of sketchy Craigslist WFH jobs are over. 

Just looking through the perks and benefits of remote work makes me wonder why anyone is going into work on a regular basis. Some of these fully remote companies have better workplace perks than traditional workplaces.

Remote work isn’t just for programmers. There are plenty of opportunities for people outside of tech to work remotely. Take a look:

I’m on a mission to get people to experiment more with their careers. So I’m teaching people how to get a remote job in 2019. My online course, How to Get a Remote Job, opens in February.